A plot summary of the play the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde

Horrified to learn that he was adopted after being discovered as a baby in a handbag at Victoria Station, she refuses him and forbids further contact with her daughter.

The Importance of Being Earnest Summary

Meanwhile, Gwendolen arrives, having decided to pay Jack an unexpected visit. The Reverend Chasuble is relieved of his two christenings that afternoon, and Gwendolen is happy that she is actually going to marry a man named Ernest.

Lady Bracknell interviews Jack to determine his eligibility as a possible son-in-law, and during this interview she asks about his family background. Thus he tries to hide his address from Algy. Besides giving the play a layer of dark humor, the death jokes also connect to the idea of life being a work of art.

He denied the term "farce" was derogatory, or even lacking in seriousness, and said "It is of nonsense all compact, and better nonsense, I think, our stage has not seen. The two men follow, explaining that they are going to be rechristened Ernest, and the women relent and agree to stay engaged. Lady Bracknell informs Jack that, as the first-born, he would have been named after his father, General Moncrieff.

She has always wanted to marry someone named Ernest, so Algy, like Jack, needs to arrange a rechristening. Algernon overhears and writes the address on his shirt cuff.

Gwendolen now enters, having run away from home.

Lady Bracknell and Gwendolen arrive. Algernon tells Lady Bracknell of his engagement to Cecily, prompting her to inspect Cecily and inquire into her social connections, which she does in a routine and patronizing manner that infuriates Jack.

Algy secretly reads it. He visits an imaginary invalid friend named Bunbury when he needs an excuse to leave the city. Alexander tried, unsuccessfully, to save the production by removing Wilde's name from the billing, [n 2] but the play had to close after only 86 performances.

He is Jack in the country, guardian of his ward Cecily, but regularly leaves for London to visit his pretend brother Ernest. While Jack changes out of his mourning clothes, Algernon, who has fallen hopelessly in love with Cecily, asks her to marry him. When Jack and Algernon reappear, their deceptions are exposed.

Lady Bracknell asks Jack to reconsider, and he points out that the matter is entirely in her own hands. She forbids the match between Jack and Gwendolen and sweeps out of the house. Algernon tells her he did it in order to meet her. However, when Jack and Algernon tell Gwendolen and Cecily that they have both made arrangements to be christened Ernest that afternoon, all is forgiven and the two pairs of lovers embrace.

When she discovers the extent of Cecily's fortune, she gives her consent to her engagement to Algernon; however, Jack's parentage is still a stumbling block to her blessings.

In The Importance of Being Earnest, Algernon has many characteristics of the dandy, but he remains morally neutral throughout the play. Cecily Cardew, a young lady, the ward of Jack Worthing.

In fact, the dandy in both plays turns out to be something very close to the real hero. Lady Bracknell returns and refutes the engagement. For years, he has also pretended to have an irresponsible black-sheep brother named Ernest who leads a scandalous life in pursuit of pleasure and is always getting into trouble of a sort that requires Jack to rush grimly off to his assistance.

However, he says he will give his consent the moment Lady Bracknell approves of his marriage to Gwendolen.

The Importance of Being Earnest

Ernest is the name Jack goes by in London, which is where he really goes on these occasions—probably to pursue the very sort of behavior he pretends to disapprove of in his imaginary brother.

Jack gives her his address. To escape from this restraint, he invents an imaginary brother named Ernest, who is supposed to be quite a reprobate and whose name and general mode of behavior Jack assumes during his frequent trips to London.

Jack also tells Algernon about his fictional brother. When Jack and Algernon reappear, their deceptions are exposed. Both girls are furious. In the entire Wilde canon, no play better exemplifies the author’s art-for-art’s-sake stand than The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial.

The Importance of Being Earnest

The play begins in the flat of wealthy Algernon Moncrieff (Algy) in London's fashionable West End. Algernon's aunt (Lady Bracknell) and her daughter (Gwendolen Fairfax) are coming for a visit, but Mr.

Jack Worthing (a friend of Algy's) arrives first. A summary of Motifs in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Importance of Being Earnest and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Read this article to know about The Importance of Being Earnest summary by Oscar Wilde. This play was written and produced in It is a comedy of identity and self-invention.

The Importance of Being Earnest Summary

It is a satire on the hollowness of Victorian society. The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde that was first published in Summary.

Plot Overview; Summary and Analysis; Summary. Read a Plot Overview of the entire book or a chapter by chapter Summary and Analysis.

Get ready to write your paper on The Importance of Being Earnest with our suggested essay topics, sample. The play begins in the flat of wealthy Algernon Moncrieff (Algy) in London's fashionable West End.

Algernon's aunt (Lady Bracknell) and her daughter (Gwendolen Fairfax) are coming for a visit, but Mr. Jack Worthing (a friend of Algy's) arrives first.

A plot summary of the play the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde
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SparkNotes: The Importance of Being Earnest: Plot Overview